All I Want
For Christmas

Bad Boys on Board

Casey

Caught in the Act

Duets 23

Fantasy

Gabe

I Brake For Bad Boys

In Too Deep

Jordan

Little Miss Innocent

Morgan

Sawyer

Say No to Joe?

Sex Appeal

Sizzle

Too Much Temptation

Treat Her Right

Wanton

When Bruce Met Cyn

Wild

 
Jamie by Lori Foster
(Zebra, $6.99, R) ISBN 0-8217-7514-6
***
Let me start right off by saying if you have read all of Foster's tales about Visitation, North Carolina, then you will probably like this book more because you will have some background to start off with. I have only read one of them, Say No to Joe, which was the first in the series. Jamie is the name of the "mountain man" who showed up in all the books. Frankly, I barely remember him being in the first book. Because I did not have the background, I was almost completely lost for the first 75 pages or more. Once I got a handle on the plot, the story picked up and was a fun and sexually-charged romance, with a secondary romance that was started in previous books.

Jamie Creed has psychic skills. Since he was a young child, he has been “different”. He knows what people think, he can see things about to happen and he has the unique ability to connect to others "remotely". Jamie was rescued from a series of foster homes by a young doctor, who immediately placed him in his lab and decided to "study him". Eight-year old Jamie didn't know any different and thought this was because the scientist cared about him. When Jamie was 19, he discovered that the doctor's assistant, DeLayna, was using him in an experiment where she swore her love to him and slept with him but was really only trying to prove that if he cared for someone, he could not get inside their head. Jamie was emotionally devastated. He escaped and has been living in the mountains outside Visitation ever since.

Jamie does care for people, particularly a group of men and their wives, all of whom he has helped get together. He is better acquainted with Joe and his sister Alyx than others. Alyx and her relationship with the deputy sheriff, Scott, is the secondary romance. She and Scott seem to have one of those “I love you – no, now I am mad at you – oh, I am so glad you still love me” type of relationships. This book resolves that. Since I had no background, I had to go with what was here. By the end, they were cute and it was fun to finally see them figure things out.

Meanwhile, Jamie has woman trouble of his own. Faith has found him on his mountain. Faith used to work at the Farmingham Institute. Jamie doesn't remember her but she remembers him and is determined to get him to help her daughter, who is also a psychic. Their relationship starts off rocky when Jamie strips her naked and does a thorough search to ensure she is not bugged or wired with any type of surveillance. Needless to say, when his friend Clint sees him drag her off to his cabin naked, the citizens of Visitation are concerned. You see, they are protective of Jamie because he has always been so caring of them.

Now, this is one of those things that were hard to understand, but was obviously something seen in the other tales. So once I could accept that, along with all the psychic stuff and the horrible things that happened to Jamie as a result of his powers, then I could settle in and enjoy. I do have to say that once I understood the plot line, the mystery was actually pretty easy to figure out. This book, however, should definitely have a disclaimer to “read only if familiar with the series”.

The sexual interactions between Jamie and Faith are inevitable and very well written, but explicit. The somewhat convoluted story about Faith's daughter is resolved in an ultimately satisfying way, but is hard to describe without giving the details away. And Jamie discovers a lot about himself as he delves into the mystery of why Faith has sought him out after almost nine years.

The entire cast of the four books made an appearance, so again, for fans, this is probably kind of fun. For those not familiar, it is a lot of people to track and figure out who they are. Foster's writing style of humor and dry wit does shine through and it is this that kept me engaged, even while I was shaking my head with confusion.

Jamiewas an uneven read for me because it caused lots of head shaking and yet, offered some pleasure too.

--Shirley Lyons


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